Dream Believer (2)

Have you ever asked the universe for advice, or taken guidance from a dream?

It’s not something I’d ever thought of doing until I learned that ‘it’ had guided successful watercolourist Anna Mason back into art after a long hiatus.  And last week I justified my own reasons for asking for myself.

I was sceptical at first, conscious that I might inadvertently seek out the ‘answers’ I was hoping for.  But with nothing to lose, on two consecutive nights I asked the universe to shine a light on my future path.  And on two consecutive days, it did.

For example, on day one, the model for my weekly life-drawing class was the life-model I drew at art college over ten years’ ago, but haven’t seen since.  Maybe it was just a coincidence.  Yet it was the first time he’d been booked by that class, and I myself had missed loads of them (including the previous three weeks).  There were other hints, and I’m still receiving encouragement.  However, they all were, and still are, pointing me in the same direction.  And who am I to argue with the universe?

It seems I am on the right path, but I may need to adjust my compass.

The post Dream Believer (2) first appeared on Filbert & Smudge.

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Dream Believer (1)

Have you ever asked the universe for advice, or taken guidance from a dream?

You know when you get that niggly feeling in the back of your mind, wondering whether you made a mistake taking art at college instead of physics, or some other ‘sensible’ subject, but no-one had a crystal ball so you had to go with your gut feelings at the time, and now your gut isn’t playing the same symphony that was so familiar to your younger self, and you look back and try to remember when it happened, whatever it was that happened, when you weren’t so sure anymore, when you just wanted to know if you made the right decision, only now you’re on a precipice and you have to choose your next move.

With my studio and its contents almost settled, I really needed to know whether I was pursuing the correct path.  I mean, you don’t have to be a creative to be creative, but you need to know which it should be.  So, I decided to ask the universe for guidance.  And it (kind of) replied…

WordPress prompt: Precipice

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Where Are They Now?

April isn’t typically the time of year most people think about setting New Year Resolutions.  But with a spring birthday, it’s a perfect time for me to reflect and set my goals for the next year of my life.

For the past year I set out to: i) overhaul my wardrobe, and ii) become prolifically creative.  However, as I write this on the eve of my blog’s first birthday, it’s difficult to pinpoint any significant changes I’ve made to achieve either.

Wardrobe Architect

My wardrobe is (slowly) improving.  Having changed a few shirt buttons, I’ve made some progress.  I still have about half-a-rail of mending/adjusting awaiting my attention.  However, reminding myself of my passion for sewing seems to have flicked the right internal switch; I’ve since finished a couple of ‘difficult’ projects.  But my real passion is for dressmaking, and I’m a sucker for a nice sewing pattern.  So hopefully I’ll get to make some new clothes for myself rather than just making do and mending the pieces I can’t bear to part with.

Prolific Creativity

When I set this goal last year I didn’t have a clue what I wanted to achieve.  Roll forward a few months and I decided that, for me, prolific creativity meant more than drawing for ten minutes every day.  Having attempted several drawing challenges since last April, I’ve learned that there’s more to this than turning up to the page and making a few choice marks.  I want my own journey to have a purpose, and when I choose my next ‘first’ step, the next ‘second’ one will naturally follow.

So, all that’s left to say is ‘Happy Birthday, Filbert & Smudge’, and ‘Cheers!’ to year number 2!

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Vacation

Sometimes it helps to step back from your easel, wardrobe, or even your life to get a better view of how things are going. We can get so focused on the details that we forget we’re in the process of creating a much bigger picture.  Just as in art class, distancing yourself with time or physical space can help you see things objectively.

Since posting my charcoal self-portrait a couple of weeks’ ago, I find myself revisiting it and picking out bits I’m not happy with. The same goes for my current wardrobe and creative routine.  I’m highlighting things that don’t quite meet my expectations, instead of acknowledging where I am now and building on this.

I’ll also admit that while drawing the left eye in my portrait (having already completed the right one) I got so focused on accuracy I didn’t even notice I’d drawn them looking in different directions until Mr C pointed this out to me!

So, I’m vacating my usual routine while I consider how I want my new life to look. It’s easy to pretend to be someone else while we’re actually on holiday.  But can we do a similar thing without going away?

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Art Mimics Life

I’ve unearthed my past, defined my core, explored individual shapes, and constructed silhouettes… all completed in order to overhaul my wardrobe. Developing a colour story is next, and this palette courtesy of The Designers Co-op (found via Colette WA week 5) is quite perfect for me.

As I work through the Colette Wardrobe Architect weekly prompts there is an obvious chasm between the person I would like to be and the person I actually portray.  Last time I asked myself whether my stagnation was due to fear, laziness, impatience or boredom, I was considering my recent drawing output.  The truth is I believe my identity as an artist/illustrator is tied into my personal image, so I need to consider the question again so I can understand the solution.

When I’m working from home, I’m conscious that I dress for quickness, comfort and practicality. I suppose I take a similar approach to my artwork.  I default to what I know, what I’m used to.  A familiar approach achieves a familiar outcome.  I fear regret, but I am also impatient – I want things to be accomplished before they’re even started.  Ridiculous, I know!  And maybe we should throw boredom in there too, just for fun.  If I default to the familiar, the boring stuff, I don’t have to acknowledge it, so I can perform in autopilot.  Not lazy, but the other three apply.

There’s an obvious solution to my fear, impatience and boredom, and it’s defined by architecture.

WordPress Prompt: Obvious

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