The Daily Sketch (2)

Regardless of your drawing experience or ability, daily drawing is an undemanding way to build creative confidence and develop muscle memory.  Last week I shared three tips that helped me to begin drawing daily.  If the blank white page leaves you with stage fright, try a different approach with these three suggestions:

Decide what you want to achieve with each drawing.  Trying to capture everything in one drawing might leave you feeling overwhelmed.  So focus on one aspect of your subject, or just use it as a means to explore your media.

Plan your drawing before you begin.  Are you going to do a detailed study of a small area or attempt the full caboodle?  The negative space around or between objects can be just as interesting as the subject itself.  And, if your drawing is quite detailed you may prefer to…

Complete your drawings over several sessions.  Don’t feel you have to attempt a new one every day.  Even simple sketches can be built up over several sessions.  Giving yourself and your drawings breathing space lets you reflect on your progress, and helps you minimise overwork.

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The Daily Sketch (1)

I’m getting used to my new daily drawing habit, with 17 consecutive days under my belt so far.  As the first few days are still fresh in my mind I’ll admit it wasn’t easy to start my daily sketchbook appointment.  So, if you’re contemplating daily drawing, but aren’t sure you’ll keep it going, here are a few suggestions to help you over the first few hurdles:

*Choose a simple subject that you’d be happy to keep drawing over several days.  I started with a mini still-life of golden yellow plums on a chocolate brown saucer.

*Keep the subject small so you can move it if you need to.  As my plums were on a saucer, I could pop them in the fridge overnight, and set them up when I was ready to draw.

*Use a media you’re comfortable with for your first piece.  I started with a simple collage and drew over the top, so I could explore colour and line in a fun way.

Look out for a few more tips next week!

The post The Daily Sketch (1) first appeared on Filbert & Smudge.

Logo Logic: Pathfinder

I won!  I actually won!  (Woo hoo!)

So, what now?  My long wait is over and I’m no longer frozen to the spot.  But I’m still feeling the cold through my feet.  It’s at this point I realise I’m going in the right direction, but I’m approaching it in the wrong way.  I make small, progressive steps, then pause to look around me, even looking backwards.  I’m hesitating about the next step, unsure of when to move.  I feel off-balance, unsteady, like I need some additional support.  Can I do this?  Turning back feels like a choice, but that would only get me back to the start, and all those previous steps wouldn’t count.

My path is made of stepping stones.  They have natural pauses and when you go too slowly you lose your flow.  If you hesitate at the wrong moment, you stumble into the water, and your feet get cold and wet.

It’s far better to take quick, successive steps.  That way you build momentum, and your sure-footedness increases with every stride.

Lesson 4: Hesitate on a path of stepping stones and you risk losing your balance.  Keep a smooth, steady pace until you reach the other side, and only then pause for breath, reflect back and prepare for the next one.

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Logo Logic: Breathing Space

I began this series explaining how my long-standing self-doubt almost triggered creative freeze.

The leap from brief to beginning can be huge, ginormous, even.  I might pretend I’m researching a project, kidding myself that this constitutes Step 1 when I’m really hunting hypotheses instead of conducting the experiment.  However, when I feel my faith resurface, the leap to Step 2 can be sooooo much easier.

With this particular project, once I’d got the creative cogs turning in my brain my journey looked a little more achievable.  And researching the topic of diversity and inclusion rather than the logo design process was a better use of my time.

I spent four nights working on my idea, fiddling with it to make sure it was just right.  But even after I’d entered it into the competition I continued to worry about it, and sought the opinion of others.  Past experience left me doubting my own judgement, and I was back in limbo.  Now I’ve had a chance to step back from it I can celebrate making a start and finishing it too.  Whether or not I won isn’t so important.

Lesson 2: Give yourself and your creative project space to breathe, from beginning to end.  You’ll learn to trust your own judgement rather than relying on the opinions of others.

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